Saturday, September 19, 2009

Ropes

Bollard, fishing boat, LivornoAfter a verbose post about my past mistakes, it's time of shorter descriptions: here are a couple of photos taken in the Old Harbor.Bollard, fishing boat, LivornoFishing boats tend to have colorful decks and it's quite easy to single out an eye catching detail.

23 comments:

Per Stromsjo said...

New paint in an old harbor. Why not!

The second shot is eye-catching. Simple, well composed, striking and effective.

Jacob said...

Yes, you know if you get too sophisticated with your historical dialectic you may find yourself tied up in knots, amidst a tangle of unwanted expectations!

Great shots, these - it's the colors!

Julie said...

Maybe for Jacob its the colours but for me it is the ropes and their knots. Have you read Shipping News. She makes such an intruiging use of knots.

I have to do this too: a long post followed by a few short ones to recover and give readers a rest!

Clueless in Boston said...

I've always been intrigued by knots and ropes too. There's an art to knot-making.

Wolynski said...

Great photos. I also like the street signs below. The devil is in the detail.

Gunn White said...

So simple and so nice.
I am always impressed about people who can do these knots not only right, but also very very quickly.
BRAVO to the colors and details i your photos.

Unseen Rajasthan said...

Simple and nice shot !Unseen Rajasthan

Hilda said...

I have got to learn how to tie me some real sailors' knots…

Tinsie said...

Love them both - the first one for the angle and the second one for the colours (I'm a bit partial to cobalt blue and white, although of course the browns and greens are also beautiful).

You can't go wrong with your descriptions, as neither of these looks anything like a fictional character :-)

Tinsie said...

On second thought, could these be the ropes from Gulliver's Travels? Hehe :-)

James said...

Great shots. You are right about the colors. :) Also this post works very well with my Something Sighted blog post.
We are in tune. :)

B SQUARED said...

Beauty "is" in the details.

nobu said...

I like those photos in the port.
By the way, I will post some photos of fishing port to my Funabashi blog, please check them.

brattcat said...

I love both of these. Each has tension and laxness. The contrast works so beautifully. And I always appreciate brevity. Thanks.

Asta said...

Hello,

This looks like paintings. Very detailed. Beautiful colours. Great shots!

Best regards
Asta

tapirgal said...

The pictures and your comments are both succinct and satisfying. But I don't mind the verbose posts, either. I really liked the Four Musketeers post!

Re: the hump behind the anchor in my last post. It's a hill that's a peninsula in the river. They call it Tongue Point, and it does have trees on it.

tapirgal said...

Hey, thanks for looking around my various web sites. Strangely enough, we used to carry Tapiro d'Oro in our gift shop. The first I saw was a keychain that a tapir fan gave me after a conference in Sardinia. Then when Lee (Bend, Oregon, Daily Photo) and I were in Rome, we saw them in a shop on the Via del Corso. They were made of plaster and painted gold. They were several inches long. We bought about 12 and shipped them home and later put them on the site. Now all are sold. We saw the program on TV while travelling after that, but it took us awhile to understand what the award was about. I believe they gave it to the Department of Highways that week for doing something - I'm sure you can imagine! My story about trying to send these items to the US through a small post office was pretty amazing, too. Let's just say the bureaucratic thinking was beyond belief! But they did arrive OK.

Is that program still on TV?

tapirgal said...

Images like the picture I took when we found Tapiro d'Oro in the shop window are one reason I almost want to do a blog like you and Cieldequimper have with your travel photos, but I'm not sure where I will find the time. I'm still thinking. Thanks for asking :)

Andreea said...

I like both the color and the intricate knots. Nice find.

Yoork said...

Those are intricate! There's probably a million different types of knots out there!

Julie said...

I like the Gulliver's Travels quip!

Ilse said...

Gotta stop mentioning these past mistakes! So what? Being a perfectionist is about control. We can't control everything. The reality here is that you research & write such interesting mini-articles for all of us to enjoy. Focus on all the good & correct. The glass is half full. Forget the mistake. Nobody was hurt (except your pride). Thanks for all the interesting photos & history you bring to us in other parts of the world.

Vogon Poet said...

@ Ilse - You are right, but don't worry, we (my friends and I) are still laughing at my mistakes and hope we'll laugh again!
We're here for fun, not to show off, and I am really glad for your kind (and realistic) words.