Monday, September 7, 2009

Livorno Story

Bas-relief with the story of Livorno, Palazzo del Governo, LivornoA side of the “Palazzo del Governo” is decorated by an elaborate bas-relief narrating the history of Livorno in several panels. The first version, by the sculptor Tommaso Peccini from Perugia, was completed in 1943, just in time to be destroyed by the war. A second version, as faithful as possible to the original, was installed in 1954. The few changes are obvious in the last two panels. The first coat of arms of Livorno was a tower standing in the sea surmounted by an “L”, here interpreted as “Labrone”.Bas-relief with the story of Livorno, Palazzo del Governo, LivornoIn this panel Livorno is shown a village around the “Quadratura dei Pisani” (Square fort of the Pisans) and the “Mastio di Matilde” (Matilda's Keep), now part of the “Fortezza Vecchia”.Bas-relief with the story of Livorno, Palazzo del Governo, LivornoThe next three panels illustrate episodes related to the siege of Livorno in 1496, which are better described in a post on Guerrino of Montenero. The first shows Maximilian I, the Holy Roman Emperor, lifting the siege of Livorno after three weeks.Bas-relief with the story of Livorno, Palazzo del Governo, LivornoIn the second we see the “libecciata” (gale force wind) that destroyed part of the imperial fleet, leading to the end of the siege.Bas-relief with the story of Livorno, Palazzo del Governo, LivornoIn the aftermath of the siege a new coat of arms, showing a castle and the “fides” banner, was given to Livorno by the grateful Florentines. On the left stands the “villano” (peasant) with his dog, on the right the Florentine commander Andrea de' Pazzi.Bas-relief with the story of Livorno, Palazzo del Governo, LivornoThe “Fortezza Vecchia” (Old Fortess) completed in 1534.

Story Continued (Part 2 of 2)

See also: Fortezza Vecchia
External links: Ferdinando I de' Medici - Gonfaloniere (Wikipedia)

19 comments:

Per Stromsjo said...

Frightfully ironic to have a piece of art completed just in time to be destroyed by war. Good to learn that it did get a second chance.

Jacob said...

What a lot of history! Do you know all of this from memory? If so, you have amazing retentive power!

Have I seen the coat of arms (as in the first panel) in a previous post. It looks very familiar.

What's the red blood flowing down all about in the second panel?

brattcat said...

I'm with Jacob, VP. So curious about all of this history you present to us regularly. You are incredibly knowledgeable. And I, too, am wondering if someone slew a pigeon as it perched above the village in that second image of the bas-relief. Looking forward to more.

Ellie said...

I like that kind of work. I like the waves and the stone map. Somebody had problems with the art - red paint - sad - hope they fined the vandal!

Tash said...

I'm very partial to reliefs, and these also tell an interesting story. The seige is really well done and the storm is incredible!

Gunn White said...

Interesting and very nice and ARTY decorations.

Unseen Rajasthan said...

What a fantastic series of Photos !! I really loved the shots and beauty...Unseen Rajasthan

Andreea said...

Interesting history. I was also wondering about the red spot.

Steffe said...

This is great. I really like these shots and the story they tell. We have a relief in Tungelsta on a somewhat smaller scale, but this is something else!

Hilda said...

How wonderful to have your city's history displayed like this! Do the kids still know what the panels say?

Definitely looking forward to the rest of the story.

Love the panel about the gale force wind destroying the ships.

Julie said...

Red splodge ... splat ...

I like the peasant and the commander looking so very similar. Appeals to my strong sense of egalitarianism.

I love all this history stuff. Ready for more when you are ... don't mind if you have to research it each time at all. You have to boil it down to make it post-size. Good job!!

Cezar and Léia said...

Adorable and informative post!
I specially like the coat of arms, about the castle and the banner.But it's hard to say because all of then are very special and beautiful!
Many thanks for sharing History!
Amazing post!
Léia

Ilse said...

I agree with the commentators. Your posts are very interesting & informative. The history of your city is brought to life for your readers.

joo said...

Very interesting post and really superb reliefs. What is this blood in the second one? Looks dramatic.

Asta said...

Hello there,

Tons of history and beautiful pictures. Thank you for sharing this.

Best regards
Asta

B SQUARED said...

Such a rich history.

Saretta said...

That's great stonework! Fascinating stuff. "Labrone" sounds like "big lip" to me! LOL!

White Oleander said...

Was the red pain incorporated in the art piece?

Paula said...

Italy is such a beautiful place and has so many beautiful things.