Sunday, March 21, 2010

Tito Neri

Tito Neri tug, IMO 9319167, LivornoAn animated view of the entrance of the “Porto Mediceo”, with the tug “Tito Neri” approaching and a service boat leaving.Tito Neri tug, IMO 9319167, LivornoThe “Tito Neri” is traveling backward, which is quite usual for tugs manouvering inside the harbor, because their type of propellers allow for a more precise and safe approach this way.Tito Neri tug, IMO 9319167, LivornoStill going backward. The tug will travel normally only outside the port proper in case of rough sea or when actually pulling a ship.Tito Neri tug, IMO 9319167, LivornoModern tugboats are propelled by azimuth thrusters which can be rotated in any horizontal direction, making a rudder unnecessary.

See what happened few years ago, more or less in the place of the first photo: explosion on board the “Cape Horn” (Livorno, 2003).

Search labels: tug

19 comments:

Gunn said...

A year ago I had never heard about a tug boat, but since I started looking and photographing more in my town I have to say that there are so MANY different boats, and the tug boats very often look very "cute".
(I am not sure if I can say that about boats.... well, I think that is how I would have described this one too.)

Jacob said...

Most interesting...who would know tugs go backward in any waters? Well, you would! Great photos, too, that show off the intricacies of the boat!

brattcat said...

particularly like that last shot.

Leif Hagen said...

Cool snaps of the tugboat! I want a ride - can you arrange that?

tapirgal said...

Your harbor seems more animated than our river, at least in these photos and the interesting video! I love your first photo with the lively colors and wonderful composition of the boats. They appear so active. And I haven't thought about whether I've seen a tug going backward except to get out of the dock. I'll be watching!

Dina said...

All this is so exciting. You are lucky to have a harbor to watch.

Amazing how they caught the explosion on video. The fireboats did a good job, it looks like.

It is always funny for me to see a boat traveling backwards. I watched a big passenger ship back out from its berth in Sydney harbor, a tight squeeze. Kind of scary to watch.

joo said...

Good subject for the first day of Spring - makes me feel like going somewhere:)
Have a nice Sunday!

Lucy Corrander said...

For a reason I can't explain (briefly!) - I find the top photo cheerfully humourous.

Lucy

Kaori said...

I like the last photo! Although I can't seem to tell which is front...

Cezar and Léia said...

So you post again about the maneuvers in a port, a subject that always fascinates me! Thanks for sharing!
God bless you!
Cezar

Stine in Ontario said...

It must be a lot of fun to watch the tub boats woking in the harbour, VP. I didn't know they are actually more precise moving backwards. Cool trivia!

Rob and Mandy said...

Powerful little tug!

Ilse said...

Sometimes we see tug boats in the Boston Harbor. Not much shipping in our harbor. Once the largest in the world.

Glennis said...

I live by the sea with a resident tug boat and I didn't know they go better backwards! Thanks for this information. Lovely photos.

VP said...

All these are relatively modern tugs, mostly built in the last ten years, and propelled with what are called 'azimuth thrusters'.
This is obviously not true for older tugs with more traditional propellers.

Dina said...

It's fun to say azimuth thrusters.
:)

Renee said...

Love the composition of these shots and also the information that you have provided as well. Cheers!

cieldequimper said...

Okay, now you have me going back to the buoys of Saturday(magnificent photo) and yesterday's GORGEOUS tug!

Wolynski said...

I wouldn't mind if you spent all your time in the harbor - there's something vital and exciting about port cities.