Monday, March 15, 2010

Torre del Marzocco

Torre del Marzocco, LivornoIn the year 1421 the Republic of Florence obtained full control over the Castle of Livorno, then a small village in a cove just south of the ancient “Sinus pisanus” (Pisan Gulf). The Marzocco tower was built around the mid-15th century on an islet in the area of the “Porto Pisano” and was probably the first important work in Livorno under the Florentine rule. The tower was probably built more for pride than to protect the old harbor, already almost interred at the time. The name came from the Florentine lion “Marzocco” on a weather vane on top of the tower. It was lost during a storm in 1737.Old postcard, Torre del Marzocco, LivornoThe octagonal tower is 54 meter tall and is still partly surrounded by a later artillery fort. Its walls were following what was then the rocky coastline of the island, still visible in the old postcard.Old postcard, Torre del Marzocco, LivornoThe island, now firmly linked to the mainland, is practically in the middle of the main cargo area of the port of Livorno, as you can easily see in this image from the post “Cranes”.Old postcard, Torre del Marzocco, LivornoThe last postcard is the print of a watercolored version of the one above, with some boats added just for fun. All these cards are dated from the first years of 1900.Postage stamp, Torre del Marzocco, LivornoWe can see the tower on a postage stamp of a set of three issued in 1931 for the 50th anniversary of the Naval Academy of Livorno.

See also: Tower of the Winds

20 comments:

Jacob said...

It's beautiful and difficult for me to think in terms of such age...If anything is standing around here from 1880, we consider it as old as Adam!

Do you collect postcards of your city and area...I have noticed you often come up with these incredible old postcards with incredible pictures of times past?

tapirgal said...

What a beautiful essay of images on this lovely tower. Of course, it's most romantic on the old island. It's great to have such a series of historic images.

Luis Gomez said...

It is so good to see your pictures. Thank you again for a lovely post and your kind words.

Kate said...

You not only take lovely photos, but always add information that enriches the images.

Gunn said...

Nice, interesting and informative.
Artistic stamp too.

Dina said...

Very nice tower. Do they ever let people go inside?
I love the old postcards.

joo said...

It's a great post VP - I love the old postcards, it superb idea to show them togeater!

Hilda said...

What an amazing history for a tower. And I love that you always find these old postcards and photos — and now stamps too! Thank you for going the extra mile, VP. History buff that I am too, I really appreciate it.

brattcat said...

Another excellent historical post from you, VP. Thank you.

Cezar and Léia said...

Another perfect and interesting history lesson!Thanks a lot dear VP, it's really cool!
Léia

Ilse said...

Excellent post. Love the old postcards.

B SQUARED said...

I will have to look around here for the missing weather vane. It could be sitting atop one of our local homes.

Kaori said...

Amazing how it still stands just as it was recorded years ago! I especially like the stamp!

Birdman said...

Thanks for including those old pictures too. And canceled stamp.

JM said...

Pity the lion is no longer there but the tower looks very well preserved and it' beautiful. Great information about it and I enjoyed the old postcards and stampo too.

James said...

That is amazing. It's hard for my to wrap my mind around the age of the tower. So much has happened. Great post.

Lois said...

What a fascinating tower! Thanks for showing the old pictures. It really gives one a sense of the history of this structure.

amatamari© said...

Beautiful tower and beautiful historic post and thanks for sharing!
:-)

Small City Scenes said...

Very interesting history. Nothing even to compare from US. It boggles the mind to think of things still standing that were built before 1600 or later. I find this fascinating. MB

Stine in Ontario said...

You must have a large postcard collection! Interesting that the tower was likely built to foster public pride. Smart idea!