Monday, May 6, 2013

Works of Mercy

These are two medallions representing the Corporal Works of Mercy, they are placed on the external wall of the “Spedali Riuniti”, the city hospital of Livorno, in Viale Alfieri.
To visit the sick medaillon, City hospital, Livorno
We can easily expect that “curare gli infermi” (to heal the sicks) should be a pertinent act for any self-respecting clinic. By the way, Matthew (25:36) speaks only of visiting the sicks, which is comfortably easier for those of us with no medical background.
To clothe the naked medaillon, City hospital, Livorno
A little more curious is the medallion about “vestire gli igniudi” (to clothe the naked), even spelled with an unnecessary i, but probably it is there only to make a pair.

See also: Spedali Riuniti
External links: Corporal Works of Mercy (Wikipedia) - Matthew 25:36 (ESV, Bible Gateway)

12 comments:

Revrunner said...

Wow! A fascist coat of arms sharing the same walls as the gospel. What a juxtaposition!

Michelle said...

Interesting, no doubt.

Jack said...

I don't understand the comment about a fascist coat of arms, so I will ignore it. I think the worn and aged aged medallions are quite appealing.

Revrunner said...

Oops! Sorry. I was referring to the Spedali Riuniti page.

Randy said...

Works of art.

VP said...

Revrunner - Costanzo Ciano was one of the founding fathers of the Fascist regime and the coat of arms of his family, a relatively recent acquisition for World War I merits, still stands outside the hospital. His son Galeazzo, who had married Mussolini's daughter, was shot by a Fascist firing squad because, with others, dared to vote his father-in-law out of power.

cieldequimper said...

I did not remember Galeazzo Ciano's son's fate. The plaques are interesting, I wonder when they date from.

Cezar and Léia said...

The medallions are beautiful, I like a lot those two angels in the first image!
Léia

Revrunner said...

I'm glad you told that part of the story, VP. Amazing how much history has been conveyed just through this single structure.

Virginia said...

Beautiful and amazing that some of the original paint color still remains.
V

Dina said...

As much as learning the history here, and seeing the old beauty on the wall, I like learning the vocabulary of the Church (e.g. Corporal works of mercy).

And yes, as you note, visiting the sick is a big mitsvah. Bikur Cholim means "visiting the sick" and thus the old Jerusalem hospital is named that.

JM said...

Wonderful!