Wednesday, May 29, 2013

Santa Maria della Spina

After the destruction of the Ponte Nuovo in 1400, it became the repository of a small piece of the Crown of Thorns, and took the name of Our Lady, of the Thorn. Brought from over seas by a Pisan merchant, the thorns were preserved with loving care in a little urn. Before faring again to distant lands he entrusted the precious relic to the care of his family. He never was heard of more, and one of his descendants, a Longhi, presented it to the church.
(“The Story of Pisa” by Janet Ross and Nelly Erichsen, 1909)
Church of Santa Maria della Spina, Lungarno Gambacorti, Pisa
One of the wonders of Pisa is the small Gothic masterpiece of Santa Maria della Spina. The church was built around 1230 on the lower bank of the river Arno, but it was dismantled and rebuilt on the higher bank during the works for the construction of the nearby Solferino bridge, in 1871.

External links: Santa Maria della Spina (Wikipedia) - “The Story of Pisa” by Janet Ross and Nelly Erichsen (Archive.org)

(Why are we posting about Pisa? Click here for an answer)

10 comments:

Jack said...

It has a remarkable form. The roofline has thorns to mirror its most valuable treasure. Cool!

Randy said...

It's so beautiful. The details are amazing.

Michelle said...

Really a beautiful and detailed structure.

Lynette said...

Thank you so much for this lovely photo and the information in your post. I really like the architectural details on the church.

Cezar and Léia said...

Splendid architecture!
Léia

cieldequimper said...

Yes, well, thank goodness we have these because we don't do anything even remotely as beautiful and intricate anymore...

Arianna said...

Vedo che il viaggio a Pisa continua! Ciao, Arianna

UIFPW08 said...

Santa Maria l'ho trovata sempre chiusa..chissà mai perché..
Maurizio

JM said...

Amazing! How truly beautiful.

Dina said...

So old and so beautiful. What a big job to move and rebuild it.

But sometimes I wonder about this religion which began with a violent and cruel act and continued to use the symbols of pain even in its architecture. Like Barluzzi's Church of the Flagellation in the Old City whose interior and even exterior follow the thorn theme.