Friday, March 21, 2014

Egagropili

Egagropili, posidonia oceanica, Scoglio della Regina, Livorno
These balls of fibrous material are called egagropili and are formed by the remains of Posidonia oceanica, a species of sea grass that is common to the Mediterranean Sea. They wash up to our coasts in various shapes and sizes.

External links: Egagropili - Posidonia oceanica (Wikipedia)
See also: Borderland

14 comments:

Michelle said...

Those look interesting. Do people do anything with them?

Revrunner said...

Well, I suppose you could use it as a beach ball for starters. ;-)

Randy said...

They look like fuzzy eggs.

Jack said...

How unusual. I wonder why they end up in balls like this.

Dina said...

No kidding! How interesting.

cieldequimper said...

I don't think I had ever seen these.

Babzy said...

nice sea Art ;)

Luis Gomez said...

These are very interesting VP.

Lowell said...

Well, this is something new! I've not seen anything like it before, either. It must be we don't have the same sea grass along our coastline. I'm wondering they have a useful purpose, such as fertilizer?

Hilda said...

Now this is fascinating. They look a bit like century eggs.

Karl Demetz said...

Interesting, I've never seen these...

Virginia said...

Amazing. Wonder how they look if you allow them to dry? Might be fun to have in a big bowl, if they dry well.
V

Traveling Hawk said...

Alliens! What are they used for?

José Mendonça said...

Great find! Aren't they amazing?