Sunday, June 12, 2011

American Gazetteer

Gazzettiere Americano, Mario Coltellini printer, Livorno“The American gazetteer” by Jedidiah Morse was first published in 1797, a few years after Joseph Scott's “Gazetteer of the United States” (1795).
In Livorno we had our first “Gazzettiere americano” in 1763, when Marco Coltellini printed a translation of “The American Gazetteer”, a British version published in London the year before.
Gazzettiere Americano, Mario Coltellini printer, LivornoA page from the Italian edition

American Gazetteer, published in London in 1862The same page of the original version

See also: “Encyclopédie” - Marco Coltellini (Wikipedia)

The American gazetteer
(S. Hall, and Thomas & Andrews, 1797 in Boston)
Il Gazzettiere americano
(Marco Coltellini, 1763 in Livorno)
The American Gazetteer
(A. Millar, and J. & R. Tonson, 1762 in London)

13 comments:

Randy said...

Excellent art work on the first shot!

ρομπερτ said...

Remaining one of my favourite means to measure time and life, newspapers.

Please have a good Sunday.


daily athens

Jack said...

Very interesting, VP. Two of the three entries are from New England: Nantucket, an island off Massachusetts, and Naragauset, a county in Connecticut where New London is located. The current county name is New London County. But a similar name, Narragansett, is a town in the adjoining state of Rhode Island and the bay that divides the two sides of Rhode Island.

Luis Gomez said...

These are really interesting. Thank you VP.

Traveling Hawk said...

I like old newspaper, with their particular fonts. It's a perfume of old times around them, always.

Cezar and Léia said...

I like the illustrations a lot!
God bless you!
Cezar

Birdman said...

Interesting how many of us are 'thinking' alike with the camera... you Brattcat today.

PerthDailyPhoto said...

How interesting VP. Was reading that last page and it seems in those days an 'f' was used instead of a 's' in a lot of places. Wonder how much longer before it changed to what we have now.

Gunn said...

Arty and very pretty.

Elettra said...

Grazie per questa notizia.

cieldequimper said...

Now that is absolutely fantastic. I need to dig more into history...

joo said...

What a fascinating post VP!

Dina said...

The poor whales.
Why did they need so much whalebone, for whalebone corsets? Oi