Friday, September 24, 2010

Canaviglia

Canaviglia, Fortezza Vecchia, LivornoThis is the only bastion named after a real person, the Neapolitan nobleman Cesare Cavaniglia, Tuscan admiral and Knight of Order of Saint Stephen. Our forefathers switched two syllables and now he'll be forever remembered as “Canaviglia”.Canaviglia, Fortezza Vecchia, LivornoThe unusual feature of this bastion is the small palace, with a view of the “Porto Mediceo”, built by Francesco I de' Medici.
Canaviglia, Fortezza Vecchia, LivornoThe “Canaviglia” seen from the swing bridge between the “Porto Mediceo” and the cargo port.Canaviglia, Fortezza Vecchia, LivornoAnother marble lion head, just like the one on the “Ampolletta”.Canaviglia, Fortezza Vecchia, LivornoA view from the Capitaneria pier, with the swing bridge open.

See also: Fortezza Vecchia - Piazza dei Grani - Scalo Regio - Porta del Duca - Cortile d'Arme - Capitana - Ampolletta - Molo del Soccorso - Palazzo di Francesco - Mastio di Matilde - From the Top
Search labels: Fortezza Vecchia

18 comments:

Per Stromsjo said...

Ha! For a moment there I reckoned you might have switched those syllables and then it turns out that certain forefathers were in fact the culprits.

This somehow reminds me of a castel not far from Stockholm. Must be an exciting place to take your camera for a stroll.

Luis Gomez said...

These are great VP. What a wonderful series. Love all of these buildings.

BlossomFlowerGirl said...

Imagine the view you'd get from the upper window in the third photo. It took me a while to connect the two syllable switch. My Italian son-in-law once said his mother bought a $4000 kabana! He meant a sofa.☺ (In Australia, kabana is cabanossi - pork sausage)

Farmchick said...

This does seem rather castle-like. Especially since our buildings in America are not as old.

tapirgal said...

These are all wonderful photos, and what a view! I'm glad you explained the name, because I almost wrote you about the "typo."

Randy said...

I'll take it, only because of the great views. Another nice one.

Halcyon said...

More great views on this spectacular site.

Kaori said...

The lion head is very impressive! :D

Dina said...

Wish I could live in that palace.

Small City Scenes said...

How funny the letters were switched and never fixed.
It would be neat to stay in the little house and watch the water and all that goes on. Nice pictures and explanation.

BTW--boat on my blog for you. MB

joo said...

You always manage to find such interesting stories matching your photos! I love this bastion!

Cezar and Léia said...

Thanks for those beautiful views!The last composition is fantastic!
Happy Friday
Léia :)

B SQUARED said...

Regardless of the view,it's spectacular.

Jacob said...

These kinds of structure are fascinating to me...If I didn't know better, I could believe I was looking at scenes from the Middle Ages.

Beautiful photos, VP! And such an interesting history.

By the by, do you know if they letters were switched intentionally or by accident. I'm not sure I'd want to be known as Andesron. ;-)

Gunn said...

Very nice shots!
Have a nice weekend !:)

JM said...

The old brick wall is fantastic! You can clearly enjoy it on the lion pic, what a great contrast.

As to the Sun Ring shot there's not much to say... :-) I was walking on the beach when the light suddenly changed; I looked up and saw the ring but to take a shot I needed something to hide the sun itself and a hand was the only thing available! :-)

VP said...

@ Jacob - Tuscans did these switches quite often, more in the past but even now. Most of times Unintentionally, I'm pretty sure of this.

@ JM - Thanks, I was curious about this strange image of yours.

Francisca said...

VP, when I saw the lion head I was beginning to doubt my memory, had I been here before? Good thing I read. I like the baby palace...