Thursday, December 17, 2009

Garibaldi

Giuseppe Garibaldi by Augusto Rivalta, LivornoGiuseppe Garibaldi is watching over his namesake square, where the statue was placed in 1889. It is the work of Augusto Rivalta, the same sculptor of the monument to Vittorio Emanuele II .Piazza Garibaldi seen from the Fortezza Nuova, LivornoGaribaldi, a military leader, is a key figure in the Unification of Italy. He is still called the “Eroe dei due Mondi” (Hero of the Two Worlds) for his military expeditions both in South America and Europe. In July 1861 he was even offered a command as major general in the Union Army.
A plaque on a building in “Viale Caprera” remind us that Garibaldi spent a night here, in the house of the friend and Garibaldine officer Andrea Sgarallino. Even the street name is a tribute to Garibaldi, who bought the island of Caprera in 1855 and died there in 1882. A nearby square is named after Anita Garibaldi, his Brazilian wife and long-time comrade-in-arms.
Plaque about Garibaldi, Livorno
In this house
Giuseppe Garibaldi
was a guest of Andrea Sgarallino
refugee from the blockaded Caprera
unshaken
in the pledge to restore Rome to Italy
forgetful of Aspromonte
with no foresight of Mentana
was here the night of 19 October 1867

The Livornesi of the Venice quarter - 1889

(This plaque recovered from the rubble of the building destroyed by an act of war was placed again on the rebuilt building by the Municipal Administration on 5 July 1957)


26 comments:

Luis Gomez said...

Thank you for this post. Great info on Garibaldi.

Stine in Ontario said...

Thanks for the history lesson. I had forgotten that Italy (although a very old civilization) has not always been one country.

brattcat said...

What a fine statue caught at a striking angle.

Jacob said...

Another fascinating historical post. This is a great statue, too, capturing the essence of a military leader. I'm continually amazed at how people are able to sculpt such lifelike figures!

I can draw stick figures, but that's about it!

tapirgal said...

Nice photos and another good history lesson. I'll be glad when December is over and I can study your excellent text more fully.

Mary Stebbins Taitt said...

Interesting historical note and sculpture!

cieldequimper said...

Very nice statue. Don't we forget that Italy and Germany are such recent countries in their present form...

Cezar and Léia said...

Your posts are always complete and informative, thanks so much!
Beautiful sculpture in this first shot!
By the way, about that name, please forgive me, I really don't know the meaning, I found about that detail tower in my Luxembourg Tourism guides and I think it's a "Lëtzebuergesch" name.It a beautiful tower detail and it stays in the old town.But the magic feeling was about those snowflacks, I love snow!!!I want much more! :)
I know...Do you think I'm fool, but it's so different from Brazil! :)
Thanks so much for your always kind visits and comments!You are so gentle!
Hugs
Léia

Julie said...

As you probably could guess, I love history, VP. However, I did not know that Garibaldi had a Brasilian wife.

That statue says a lot about the sort of power he wielded. It also tells me that he liked power.

Birdman said...

Ya, Kitty... the angle's the thing. By the way, my sister lives on Garibaldi Street in Oregon, named after this cat!

Andreea said...

Nice photos and history lesson. Garibaldi was undoubtedly one of the greatest political leaders of the 19th century.

joo said...

Garibaldi, in the first photo seems so proud and full of dignity!
Beautiful sculpture!
During my last trip to England I visited little village, Burnham, and surprise, surprise - one of the oldest and most popular pubs there is called Garibaldi's!

B SQUARED said...

His legacy extends far beyond your borders.

Halcyon said...

He looks very proud of his accomplishments!

In Three Rivers, Michigan said...

Wonderful angle on the first photo - the statue as it was meant to be seen! And thanks for the history refresher - I looked up his wife, as well, another fascinating person.

Three Rivers Daily Photo

JM said...

That's a beautiful imposing statue and the square looks just great!

We have a chocolate mousse cake called Garibaldi and it's one of my favourites, but have no idea why it's called so! Do you also have them there? I don't remember... :-)

Vogon Poet said...

@ Léia - Thanks, you're very kind...

@ JM - No, we haven't, but this is very interesting...

Vogon Poet said...

Thank you for all the reminders of Garibaldi around the world... Let me mention Garibaldi utca (strret) in Budapest and his statue in Washington Square, New York City.

Per Stromsjo said...

A military leader with a political vision.

Ellie Vellie said...

Brazilian wife! He really was into adventures. There is a Garibaldi square in Sofia, Bulgaria. They are about to build a statue there too

http://sofiaecho.com/2009/10/01/792910_garibaldi-statue-greets-berlusconi

Kaori said...

He has a very grand beard. Nice pose :)

Wolynski said...

Did Garibaldi spend just the one night in Livorno or is he associated with the city in other ways?

Dina said...

It is sad to think of places like this in "the rubble of war."

Hilda said...

Thank you for a very interesting post about a man I know nothing about. I think I have to look for more Italian history books. Somehow, we have more British history books available here than any other country (except the US, that is).

Wonderfully made sculpture. The fabric of his cape and his beard are especially great.

Ilse said...

Wonderful post. Majestic statue. A tribute to an historical figure who was larger than life when he was among us & who still captures the imagination long after his passing.

Steffe said...

Thanks for the history lesson.