Sunday, September 16, 2012

Agustín de Iturbide

We have already seen the elaborate Coat of Arms of Mexico in another post, but the Mexican flag has another link with Livorno, well beyond the annual ceremony of the Foreign Navies during the TAN.Foreign Navies ceremony, piazza del Municipio, LivornoThe actual flag of Mexico took its distinctive, if slightly different, form as the flag of the First Mexican Empire and was designed in 1821 by the future emperor himself: Agustín de Iturbide.
Augustine I of Mexico was deposed in 1823 and, as other emperors did before him, chose an exile in Tuscany. He rented a small country house in Livorno where he lived with his family and some servants, writing his memoirs.Emperador Agustin I de MexicoSpain continued to pressure the Grand Duchy of Tuscany to expel Iturbide, who finally moved to Great Britain, where he was able to publish his memories.
After his departure, the situation in Mexico continued to worsen and Iturbide was convinced to return home. He arrived on 14 July 1824 and was initially greeted enthusiastically, but soon he was arrested, tried and sentenced to death. Iturbide was executed by firing squad on 19 July 1824.Plaque remembering Agustín de Iturbide, Sanctuary of Montenero, LivornoIn Montenero he is rememberend by a plaque in Spanish and Italian placed on the wall of the Sanctuary, where he used to pray.

See also: The Legend of Tenochtitlan
External links: Flag of Mexico - Agustín de Iturbide (Wikipedia)

9 comments:

Luis Gomez said...

Wonderful post VP. Thank you.

Jack said...

If it were me, I would have stayed comfortably in Tuscany.

Lois Evensen said...

Great history lesson. Fantastic post.

Randy said...

Love this post.

Dina said...

Oi, better to stay in Livorno than to face a firing squad.

JM said...

I didn't know about this. Great information.

VP said...

Dina - Slightly better...

Traveling Hawk said...

It's an interesting story, VP!

Stefan Jansson said...

Thanks for the history lesson.