Thursday, November 19, 2009

White Sea

White Sea, IMO 9006291, port of LivornoAs you can see from the mangled superstructure the “White Sea” had some bad encounter. She was leaving port in the early morning of November 5, the same day of my posts “Rough Sea” and “Lisbon Express”, when she lost power and crashed on the tetrapods of the “Curvilinea”. She was rescued and towed back inside the port by the effort of a pilot and two tugboats.White Sea, IMO 9006291, port of LivornoFour days after, the “White Sea” has just entered the smaller “Bacino di carenaggio” (dry dock), which we see still full of water.White Sea, IMO 9006291, port of LivornoAnother day has passed and, sitting on the bottom of the dry dock, the ship awaits all the repairs she needs. Yesterday morning she was still there and works were in progress.

20 comments:

Paula said...

That is a big ship and it must have been a harrowing experience for the captain and crew. I'm glad she's safely back in port.

Leif Hagen said...

It's lucky that "White Sea" made it back safely into harbor! Oj da!

brattcat said...

What an ordeal! And what a lot of work must be done to repair the damage. But it sounds as if everyone made it back safely.

Jacob said...

Ouch! I wonder if the captain got in a bit of trouble?

She did take a hit.

Interesting series of shots, VP!

cieldequimper said...

Le bassin de carénage ou carène. ;-)Amazing how near to the city buildings it is.

Kaori said...

She looks so wounded in the first shot! Sounds scary. Hope she recovers!

Cezar and Léia said...

I think this kind of repair takes several days.
Great pictures!
Léia

Hilda said...

The poor thing. The winds and seas must have been rougher than even your photos had shown!

In Three Rivers, Michigan said...

The first is an interesting photograph, with the airplane and the tangled superstructure. I'm sure that it was unpleasant for the crew! Interesting to see the water drained from around the ship in dry dock. "Bacino di carenaggio."
Three Rivers Daily Photo

Vogon Poet said...

@ ciel - This is the smaller (135m) and older dry dock. Tt is at the end of the 'Canale dei Francesi', no translation needed...
A larger one (350m) is at the entrance of the port. There are also two floating docks around.

@ Three Rivers - I didn't see the plane at first...

cieldequimper said...

And here was me thinking that Brest had the largest ones in Europe or so I was told. They can have 500 000 tons ships... At least that's what I learned during my postgraduate degree in maritime law! Grazie per l'informazione.

Vogon Poet said...

@ ciel - Our larger one is old and out of order and was used recently only for repairs, not for construction.
I think one of the largest is at the former Chantiers de l'Atlantique in Saint-Nazaire.

lodolite said...

blog molto interessante.
simona

BlossomFlowerGirl said...

Glad to hear the ship made it safely back. The first photo is reallky good - I likethe plane in the background.

To answer your question, yes, the wines were alright, their Chardonays being better than their reds. Alas, I'm a Shiraz girl - I just love a deep, full-bodied red with peppery overtones.
Cheers.
Melbourne Daily Photo

Mary Stebbins Taitt said...

YIKES!

Glad they can fix her. That must have been scary!

Frank said...

That really was a serious storm you showed us...we all felt blessed to not have to be out in it. Dry dock facilities are quite the operation - seeing a large ship high and dry is awesome and unbelievable.

tapirgal said...

It must be fascinating having big dry docks to watch. We have a place where many of the fishing boats are kept out of water. It's a great place for photos. I can't believe I haven't shown any from there yet, except I remember taking a lot of lousy ones. I'll have to go back.

Thanks for visiting the Astoria Column while I was out of town :)

Andreea said...

Sometimes the nature wants to show us that she's a force to be reckoned with. Wish the White Sea a speedy recovery :)

JM said...

The plane couldn't fit better on the first shot! Well done.

Vogon Poet said...

@ tapirgal - Please, do it!