Sunday, August 9, 2009

Luogo Pio

Former church of the Luogo Pio, LivornoThe “Luogo Pio” (Pious Place) church or, as originally called, of the “Assunzione della Vergine e di San Giuseppe”, is one of the churches of the “Venezia Nuova” (New Venice) quarter. It was the church of an orphanage, whose buildings were badly damaged in the last war and then demolished.Former church of the Luogo Pio, LivornoIt was built in 1715 for Cosimo III de' Medici by the renowned architect Giovanni del Fantasia. On his death, few years later, the architect himself was buried inside the church, but during the last war his tomb was desecrated. The marble scroll over the front door replaces the original one destroyed by the French in 1799.Former church of the Luogo Pio, LivornoNow the small building stands alone in a large square, which is practically a glorified parking space. The church, now deconsecrated and owned by the municipality, was given in use to the Seventh-day Adventist Church.Former church of the Luogo Pio, LivornoOne of the few positive effect of “Effetto Venezia” is that even this building was open to the public, so we could offer a couple of grainy shots of the interior of the church.Former church of the Luogo Pio, LivornoYou can see the apse and the gallery over the main entrance. The black panels present in both images are part of an art installation hosted in the building.

17 comments:

James said...

What an amazing place. Very sad about the destruction that comes with wars.
I'm glad this historic building is seeing new life though.

cieldequimper said...

Oops... The French... :-( It's an extreme beauty though. I especially like those cherubs (cherubini?)
Si signor, we say farniente in francese and that's what I intend to do today! Fare niente, niente, niente!

Fio said...

Interesting post. I like the way you tell the history of your city.

Jacob said...

Wonderful photos, VP. Sad, but interesting story. And the interior shots don't look very grainy on my computer.

Seventh-Day-ers? The Virgin must be turning over in her 1st century Jewish cemetery!

And why do they call part of a church by the name of a snake? Oh, wait, that's an apse, not asp!

Nice you didn't have to bug Stefano to get you in here! ;-)

Hope you're having a great day!

brattcat said...

What a history. Thank you for taking us on this tour. The great exterior shots and detailed interior shots help us walk beside you through this church and its story.

Leif Hagen said...

Great history lesson and wonderful interior church shots! Well, and great exterior snaps, too! Grazie mille
Ciao

JM said...

What a great post! The church is gorgeous and your shots are fantastic! But it's allways so sad knowing how much has been destroyed by wars!...

Kate said...

Thanks for the history lesson. I particularly like the delicacy of the cross and the colour of the walls.

ellievellie said...

Spectacular church! Where were you when you took the first picture - looks like you were in the air somehow - reveal the mystery!

tapirgal said...

Those were excellent! Nicely composed pictures of a beautiful place. I'm glad you got to go inside, even if you had to tolerate the carnival to get the chance.

Per Stromsjo said...

I wish the last war was really the last war.

m_m said...

Great photos! It has beautiful inside.

ellievellie said...

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amatamari© said...

Very interesting that your post:
the story of a church which tells
also the history of the place.
I like that the church then is again a place of worship and also the initiative to open to the public.
Thanks also for the photos, the first in particular for very nice shot and color.
:-)

Hilda said...

The simplicity of the facade hides an ornate treasure! I am just glad that it is being used rather than being demolished especially after what it has gone through.

About your question about the designers and architects of the Ayala Commercial Center: I couldn't find information about them either, which is why I didn't mention it. But I sent a message to a couple of friends who might be able to get me the information. I hope they can. I'll let you know.

Nikki Beaumont said...

These are all great photos but that second to the last one is awesome! I love the keyhole looking framing of it and that light shining down from the top. Beautiful! What an amazing building and history! I am so glad that you thought to share this place with us!

Tinsie said...

Interesting shots. Thanks for sharing them with us :-)